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Death By Train

September 25th, 2008 | 09:21 PM

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His end was quick, I hope, though I’ll never know for sure. I can only pray that he felt no pain, that the blow was so fast, so furious, so severe that he died on impact or lost consciousness before knowing his fate.

What I know for sure is that his fate was sealed. His time had come. It was a horrific sight. I saw no blood, but that’s because his body lay directly atop the rail, one side exposed to full view, the other hidden, mercifully, from sight.

I looked in the papers but found nothing about the accident. I’ll never know his name, or if he had a family, or children, or if he was married.

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25th Anniversary Of Brutal Maradona Foul

September 24th, 2008 | 09:14 PM

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Twenty-five years ago today a brutal, intentional foul nearly changed the course of soccer history. The foul, which occurred in a game between the European clubs Barcelona and Athletico de Bilbao, and is shown in the above video, left Diego Maradona with a fractured left ankle. But it could have been worse. Maradona was operated on the same day, according to a Mundo Deportivo story commemorating the event. The operation was a success. Three years later Maradona – and the “Hand of God” – led Argentina to win the 1986 World Cup.

Link: BBC Timeline of Maradona’s Life

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Democrats Gather To Watch U.S. Presidential Debate

September 24th, 2008 | 08:29 PM

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 The Democrats Abroad in Argentina are gathering this Friday to watch the first debate between Senators John McCain and Barrack Obama (assuming there is a debate). The gathering, which also is a fundraiser for the group, will take place at 8pm at the Sacramento Resto Bar, El Salvador 5729. More details can be found here, and here. Event sponsors think as many as 300 people will show up. You can see a press release for the event here.

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Cristina’s Approval Rating Slides To 28%

September 24th, 2008 | 08:00 PM

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Argentine President Cristina Fernandez’s approval rating slid one point to 28% in August, according to a survey published Wednesday by the consulting firm Poliarquia Consultores. This a still up from the president’s 20% low in June, but way down from her 54% high in December. Some 34% of the population views the president negatively, down from 36% a month ago.

Fernandez is most popular among people aged 30-49 and least popular with younger and older Argentines. She is most popular in northwestern Argentina and least popular in the country’s farming heartland, or the Pampas region. Fernandez is most popular among people who have gone to elementary school and least popular among those who have done college-level coursework.

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Argentina Again Ranks Badly In Corruption Survey

September 23rd, 2008 | 07:22 PM

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Argentina is more corrupt than it was a year ago, according to the results of a Transparency International survey released Tuesday. The survey, in which Argentina typically ranks poorly, rated the land of the Gaucho as the 109th least corrupt country out of 180 surveyed.

That means 108 nations are less corrupt than Argentina, according to the survey, which actually measures perceived corruption. Last year Argentina ranked 105th while in 2001 it ranked 59th, thought that survey included only 91 countries.

Argentina’s poor showing is inline with that of other countries in the region, which has long been a bastion of corruption. “Among the 32 countries from the Americas included in Transparency International’s (TI) 2008 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI), 22 scored less than 5 points out of 10, indicating a serious corruption problem, and eleven failed to exceed the three-point mark, indicating rampant corruption,” TI said in a statement. Argentina scored 2.9 points, making it one of those places were corruption is “rampant.”

TI said anti-corruption efforts in the region “appear largely to have stalled.” In contrast to Argentina’s bleak performance, Canada remained the “cleanest,” most trustworthy country in the Americas this year. It was followed by the U.S., which ranked 18th in the world. Haiti was the region’s most corrupt country, followed by Venezuela, which gave birth to the famous $800,000 dollar suitcase brought into Argentina by Guido Alejandro Antonini Wilson. (If you’re interested in that story, click here for the latest English-language update.)

In South America the least corrupt country was Chile, which ranked 5th in the Americas and 23th in the world. Denmark ranked No. 1. overall.

Link: The 2008 TI Survey in English

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The Wall Street Journal On Las Barras Bravas

September 22nd, 2008 | 09:24 PM

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Wall Street Journal correspondent Matt Moffett had an excellent story in last week’s paper about one woman’s efforts to teach hooligans “how to play nice.” The story, which landed on the front page of the printed paper, got a bit lost amid all the chaos surrounding global financial turmoil. But in typical Moffett fashion, it’s a finely crafted and reported story and is well worth your time. You can check it out here.

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Maroon Five To Play At Luna Park

September 22nd, 2008 | 08:21 PM

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The Grammy Award winning American pop band Maroon Five will play Luna Park November 11 at 9:30pm. Tickets are on sale here. Prices range from about 100-300 pesos. The band is perhaps best known for its 2002 album Songs About Jane.

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Argentines Worried About Global Financial Crisis

September 22nd, 2008 | 08:20 PM

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Argentines are more worried about the global financial crisis than any other problem on people’s minds these days, according to a new survey by the consulting firm Ibarómetro. “The world financial crisis has become a central topic and concern for Argentines,” Ibarómetro said Friday in a report. Around 28% of people polled said they were more concerned the financial crisis than anything else. Almost 23% said they were mainly worried “other” things, though Ibarómetro did not elaborate on this. It was not clear if Ibarómetro gave respondents a range of options or if it simply recorded the top concerns.

Other polls have shown crime to be a major concern. In any case, around 20% of those polled said their top concern was the national statistics agency, or INDEC, which stands accused of lying about inflation data. Just under 10% said they were most worried about the recent mafia-style murder of three businessmen widely believed to be invovled in drug trafficking, while another 6% said they were mainly concered about the Venezuelan suitcase scandal. Almost 8% said their main concern is a trial over the 2004 Cromañon nightclub tragedy in which 194 people were killed.

In a separate poll, almost 40% of respondents said Argentina would be affected a lot (“mucho”) by a worldwide financial crisis while 42% said such a crisis would have little (“poco”) impact on the country.

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Argentina’s Gas Prices Still Among Lowest

September 21st, 2008 | 09:19 PM

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Inflation has been eating away at Argentina’s comparatively low prices in recent years, but the cost of a gallon of gas here is still relatively inexpensive compared with many countries. The average price of a gallon of gas in July was $3.56, according to a global survey by Portfolio.com. That’s much higher than the 12 cents it costs in Venezuela (the cheapest in the world) but much less than the $11.18 paid in Turkey (the world’s most expensive).

The average price in South America is $3.96 while in Uruguay it is $6.44 and in Chile it is $5.18. In Brazil a gallon goes for $6.38.

In the U.S. a gallon is $3.73 while in Canada it is $4.66. In Europe the average cost is $7.52, with the highest price being $9.97 in The Netherlands and the lowest $3 in Greenland.

Portfolio.com has an excellent interactive graphic that allows you to hover over each country and look at its gas prices as well as its per capita GDP. You can see the map here.

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The World’s First Solar-Powered Art Module

September 20th, 2008 | 09:18 PM

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Friends of The Argentine Post over at ThisIsNotAGallery this week will introduce the world’s first solar-powered portable art gallery. “One of the objectives of the project is to place art modules in public places all over the world so people can enjoy free art in their everyday life,” ThisIsNotAGallery said in an ad promoting the new environmentally friendly galleries.

The modules will contain portable DVD players showcasing the work of various artists – including Brazil’s Leticia Ramos and Argentina’s Los Angeles-based Juan Bobillo – whose work appears in video format. ThisIsNotAGallery aims to promote both art and the use of clean energy, so help them out by checking out their work this week at BA Art Week.

BA Art Week or La Semana Del Arte
Where: Everywhere around the city
Here you will find maps of the various city barrios and summaries of what’s happening in each.
When: Sept. 21 through September 27
More info here (in Spanish)

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The Pleasure Of Live Music En El Microcentro

September 17th, 2008 | 09:17 PM

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One of the great pleasures of walking around downtown Buenos Aires is that occasional encounter with the talented musicians who often perform at the corner of Florida and Diagonal Norte. Sometimes it’s a soloist, other times it’s an entire band playing Beatles covers or original songs. Last night it was Tapy, a solo drummer who plays three nights a week at the corner. He’s usually there by around 7pm or so Monday, Wednesday & Friday. Tapy has been playing the drums for 20 years, and it shows. He has an excellent sense of timing and his percussive rhythms- as well as his constantly shaking head – will entertain and take you into another world, even if just for a few moments. You can check him out here in the latest Argentine Post video.

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Buenos Aires Province Bans Plastic Bags

September 16th, 2008 | 09:16 PM

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The Buenos Aires Province Legislature last week approved a ban on non-biodegradable plastic bags used at supermarkets. Most supermarkets will have one year to eliminate use of the bags, which are considered to be wasteful and bad for the environment. Smaller markets that specialize in selling food will have two years to get ready for the new rules. Stores that do not comply with the new law will be subject to fines and could even be closed.

Other cities and countries (including San Francisco and Ireland) recently have banned plastic bags to curtail waste and environmental degradation.

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