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HDTV Comes To Argentina

November 2nd, 2008 | Categoría: Technology

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It’s been a long wait, but HDTV has finally come to Argentina. CableVisión announced this weekend that it has started offering offering two channels, HBO HD and Movie City HD, in high definition. According to this La Nacion article, DirecTV this weekend also launched HDTV signals.

So far, no Argentine programming is available. Moreover, the Argentine government hasn’t even decided on which HDTV broadcast standard it wants to implement, meaning it could be years before locally produced shows start showing up in HD on Argentine airwaves.

Since the late 1990s the government has been wobbling back and forth over this issue. Planning Minister Julio De Vido recently said the government will likely to adopt the Japanese HDTV standard, which is also used in Brazil. But he wouldn’t discard opting for the U.S. or European standards. The state’s eternal vacillation has only delayed deployment of HDTV services.  

To take get HDTV you need an HDTV with 1080i resolution. DirecTV does not yet have any information about its service on its site, but CableVisión’s says it will broadcast in full 1920 x 1080 with Doby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound. Finally! CableVisión will charge 32 pesos a month for its Movie City HD package (including one HD channel and seven SD channels) and 38 pesos for its HBO HD package (including one HD and 10 SD channels). That’s in addition to a setup box, which costs a one-time fee of 600 pesos, plus 30 a month (or 1,999 pesos and no monthly fee). More details are here.

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2 Comments

FernandoNo Gravatar says:

“The state’s eternal vacillation has only delayed deployment of HDTV services.”

Pure drivel, anti-government propaganda. Chile hasn’t decided either. Uruguay Colombia and Brazil are the only three countries which have decided, and Uruguay did so only this year. Brazil started using ISDB-T last year.

FC

taosNo Gravatar says:

Haha, you’re hilarious, Fernando. So if you were in a race of eight people, say, for example, in the 100M dash, you’d rather compare yourself with the guys who came in last than the ones who came in first, second or third? Argentina decided in 1998 to adopt ATSC, then De la Rua ordered a “review,” which went nowhere, and now years later we’re still waiting while the government again reviews the technology.

Now, a decade after Menem first decided to go for ATSC, we’re still on the fence. If that’s not delaying this thing, I don’t know what would be. You can call it propaganda if you’d like, but these are the facts. One of the reason progress is so scarce here is that successive governments keep undoing everything done by their predecessors. I don’t know which system is better (the Japanese, the European or the American), but I’m pretty sure I could figure it out and make a decision in less than a decade!

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