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Cristina: ‘God Wanted Me to Be President’

May 26th, 2010 | 07:25 AM

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The above quote is from Argentine President Cristina Fernández last Friday.

In preparing for the country’s bicentennial celebration, she said,”The truth is that God wanted me to be president of the bicentennial.”

Dr. Lecter, the artist who made the above poster, kindly provided this for The Argentine Post.

The doctor regularly publishes his political humor at Perfil.com. You can see his Perfil blog here.

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Dr. Lecter: Kirchner Takes On South America!

May 17th, 2010 | 06:55 PM

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Dr. Lecter, the creative artist who made the above poster, kindly provided this translated version of a piece he published previously at Perfil.com, where he regularly posts his political humor.

You can see more of his work here, on his Perfil.com blog.

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Surprisingly, Argentina Using Less Pirated Software

May 11th, 2010 | 06:12 PM

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Perhaps surprisingly, given one of the worst global financial crises in decades, the use of pirated software declined in Argentina last year, according to the new Seventh Annual Global Software Piracy Study.

In 2009 about 71% of the software on Argentine computers was “trucho,” or pirated. That’s down from 73% the previous year.

Worldwide, pirated software usage rose to 43% from 41%.

Despite the improvement here, the vast majority of Argentines use pirated software.

That’s true in households, government buildings and businesses across the nation. Most “mom & pop” computer shops around the country routinely install pirated software for their clients.

To combat the problem, software producers offered a new approach, the report said: (more…)

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The Gap Between Kirchneristas and Anti-Kirchneristas

May 9th, 2010 | 07:58 PM

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For almost two years opinion polls have indicated that Argentine President Cristina Fernández and her husband, former president Néstor Kirchner, are highly unpopular.

Most Argentines dislike the Kirchners, according to the polls.

The Kirchners dispute this notion, however, saying that their polls show the First Couple to be very popular. Last week Presidential Cabinet Chief Anibal Fernández was asked about the issue.

“Why is Kirchner so unloved?” journalist Marcelo Longobardi asked. “Relax, it’s not that way at all,” replied Fernández. “Kirchner is very loved, very popular.”

Repeating the argument often offered by the Kirchners themselves, Fernández said the government’s own opinion polls show Kirchner to be highly popular.
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Argentina To Ban Some Foreign Foods, Beverages

May 6th, 2010 | 06:11 PM

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Do you like Pringles? How about fiery Tabasco sauce or JIF peanut butter?

What about Philadelphia Cream Cheese, ranch dressing or Hershey’s chocolate?

How about Scotch whisky?

If you like any of these things, or any other kind of imported food, you might be unhappy to learn that such goods may soon disappear from local stores.

Starting June 1, the government plans to ban food and drink imports if the products have an Argentine-made equivalent.

Nope, I’m not making this up. Indeed, I spent half the day Thursday confirming this with major retailers and industry executives who are familiar with the government’s plans.

So if the government goes ahead with its plans, you may need to say goodbye to those yummy treats and get used to eating more of the home-grown stuff. The ban does not apply to “foreign” products – say, Kellogg’s cereals, for example – that are produced in Argentina.

The article I wrote isn’t available online, but La Nación, which broke the news, has a story here (in Spanish) with more details.

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Al Jazeera Video: Kirchner Becomes Unasur Chief

May 5th, 2010 | 06:29 AM

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The fledgling Union of South American Nations, or Unasur, on Tuesday elected former Argentine President Néstor Kirchner as its first permanent leader.

The decision was not popular in neighboring Uruguay, where the Kirchners are unpopular, in part because of their failure to solve a long-running dispute over the installation of a pulp mill along a shared river.

Nonetheless, Uruguay’s new president, Jose Mujica, said he wouldn’t vote against Kirchner. Mujica acknowledged that allowing Kirchner to become Unasur’s chief would “cost” him politically in Uruguay.

Meanwhile, it was unclear how Kirchner, who has never been particularly interested in either diplomacy or travel, will carry out his role while also fulfilling his duties as a recently-elected congressman in Argentina.

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Cristina Decrees a 4-Day Weekend May 22-25

May 4th, 2010 | 06:27 AM

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Wooohooo! Argentine President Cristina Fernández on Monday signed a decree declaring Monday May 24 a national holiday.

The decree, which aims to help Argentines celebrate the country’s 200th bicentennial anniversary, thereby creates a four-day weekend from May 22-25. Tuesday May 25 is already a national holiday.

“People need to have their lives planned,” Fernández said Monday, noting that she had asked Congress to pass a bill approving the holiday.

But by Monday it didn’t appear that Congress would get around to voting on the holiday, so Fernández took action, making a congressional vote unnecessary.

“People need to be able to participate in all of the celebrations that will take place all around the country,” she said. “This is a once in a lifetime event. It really was necessary to declare this a holiday. What the heck, if people in Congress don’t understand that this should be a holiday, then we’ve got some problems. It’s just silly.”

On May 25 of each year Argentina celebrates the creation of its first government.

For more info about Argentina’s public holidays (in Spanish) click here.

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Forgetting Critics, CFK Touts Free Speech for All

May 3rd, 2010 | 08:00 PM

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If ever there were a defender of liberty and freedom of speech in Argentina it is Cristina Fernández de Kirchner.

That, at least, is what Fernández wants you to believe.

On Friday the president described herself as an “icon” of freedom of speech.

Fernández said she would rather have 10 million people criticize her presidency than allow even one person to be harmed by an act of government “repression.”

“If there is an icon or something that defends freedom of speech with greater density and power, and defends what can be done in Argentina – from the media, or from the street, or from wherever – it is this president,” she said, referring to herself.

It’s unclear how Fernández might try to reconcile her comments Friday with her actions two years ago, when the former government official, street thug and racist hate-monger Luis D’Elía left a meeting with her to silence the voices of peaceful protesters gathered in the Plaza de Mayo.
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