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Netflix Details Its Product Plans for Argentina

September 7th, 2011 | Categoría: Entertainment, Technology

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Netflix CEO Reed Hastings provided new details on Wednesday about the company’s online video service in Argentina.

Among other things, Reed said Netflix aims to have all of its TV and movie offerings available in their original languages with subtitles and secondary audio options.

The video streaming company, which already has more than 25 million customers in Canada and the U.S, started streaming in Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay on Wednesday, a day after it launched in Brazil. By the end of next week, Netflix will be offering its service to 43 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.

For a look at why Netflix launched here before doing so in Asia and Europe, check out my article here.

For local readers, the key points are that Netflix will:

*Expand its online library on a daily basis
*Continue adding subtitles and other language options
*Add Argentine production content
*Allow users in any one country to automatically view content when they are traveling in another that offers Netflix. So, if you sing up in Argentina, you will be able to watch U.S. content when you’re in the U.S., etc.
*Continually add to the number of devices that allow you to watch Netflix on your TV. Soon Argentine-made Samsung and LG Smart TVs will allow for Netflix streaming. Other devices, like the Xbox, will be compatible as early as November. The company is working with Apple to make its service available on iPhones & iPads too. It’s not clear when Netflix might be able locally via Apple TV.
*Will automatically detect the speed of your broadband connection and adjust the quality of the streaming accordingly. The faster your connection, the better your video quality will be. As a general rule of thumb, if your connection is fast enough to watch YouTube, it’s fast enough to use Netflix, which is capable of streaming at 1080 HD.

If you’re a U.S. or Canadian expat in BA, you can continue to use your accounts here. Netflix will automatically recognize your IP address and start offering you content that is available in Argentina. Likewise, instead of paying 39 pesos a month, you can sign up in the U.S. and pay $7.99 per month, getting the very same access.

In general, the content on Netflix in Argentina is at least one year old, for now. That means you won’t find the latest TV episodes or movies on Netflix. This may change in the future as the company signs more distribution deals. Netflix currently offers about 10,000 hours worth of content in Argentina.

Netflix has a very complex algorithm system that measures your movie preferences – when you rate shows online – and learns your interests. The site has more than 6.5 billion user preferences stored online and it uses that information to change the way TV shows and films are displayed on your screen. The more you use Netflix, the better it gets at suggesting movies and shows for you.

You can sign up here. You’ll need a credit card or a Paypal account. The company is exploring for ways to add additional payment options in Argentina.

If you have any questions, let me know. I’ll try to get you answers.

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9 Comments

StaffordNo Gravatar says:

Great post and article in the WSJ, Taos. Was there any mention of Cuevana at the press conference?

taosNo Gravatar says:

Hey Stafford,

Thanks for the kind comments. Yes, Netflix is fully aware of Cuevana and the topic came up several times. Hastings even jokingly referred to it but not by name, saying Netflix will work late on Friday and Saturday nights, when Cuevana, apparently, sometimes doesn’t work because of high demand for it.

But in general they believe they’ll eventually win over large numbers of converts by offering a service that is constantly improving and easy to use, as well as one that works on TVs. They also plan to offer multiple language options, which should prove popular in the months ahead.

It’ll be interesting to see how this all plays out.

Saludos!

StaffordNo Gravatar says:

Cool! Thanks for the update. Will be interesting to see when I can access my netflix account from here w/out needing an IP blocker. Soon it sounds like.

MarcNo Gravatar says:

The bandwidth adjusting algo is pretty cool. Most of the time I receive a clear picture but once in a while it will pixelate quite a bit like a horrible Youtube video. Not bad for a 1M connection that’s far from their servers. Watching through a PS3 on WiFi but I might wire it to improve the connection. I wish they would allow some sort of buffer adjustment setting to prevent that. I’d rather allow a movie to preload for 5-10 minutes than deal with reduced picture quality due to minor lag issues here and there.

Even though the current catalog is old, I’m finding a lot of interesting movies or shows I’ve missed. Plus, it’ll be fun to re-watch some old classics. I don’t know what is up with some of the channels on cable lately, maybe it is something with my provider, but I’ve noticed that FX, Cinecanal, TNT, Film Zone, and a few others are now primarily showing dubbed movies and series when they were previously subtitled. It’s nice to have another option and 39 pesos a month is practically pocket change these days.

MichaelNo Gravatar says:

It feels like they’ve already added some content. Noticed some things today that I didn’t see yesterday.

samNo Gravatar says:

Thanks for the followup article which answered all my questions! I plan to use both Netflix and Cuevana.

glenNo Gravatar says:

I noticed Pandora is able to stream here in Mendoza today as well. This was not possible even last week or anytime over the past few years. Is it possible the US media publishers have made some international agreements just recently? Or is it a temporary bug in Pandora?

FredNo Gravatar says:

Pandora’s bug probably. It’s not working today.

glenNo Gravatar says:

Yes it only worked for 5 or 6 weeks. It stopped working recently.

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